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in lebanon that he lived through when he became politically aware, and i also a child ofle al-as sad. those changed his world view more so than spending 18 months in london getting an advanced degree in ophthalmology or the fact he liked western music, and ultimately in my view -- which is really the story of this book in many ways -- is, again, many of us hoped he would change the authoritarian system. i think in the enwhat happened is the system changed him. and this is unfortunately, even among the most well-intentioned authoritarian leaders because they raileesed to survive in that environment you have to succumb to that environment. you have to assimilate into that environment. so, the system in syria is very inert in that sense and was much more difficult to overcome, obviously, and perhaps he didn't have the -- where with annual and ability to take on the real forces in syria who are status quo forces and against any change that might undermine the foundation of their rule and situation. >> the situp in syria by the colonial powers was france was working with a shiite sect, which is
to lebanon in '88 everybody say poor man, what are you going to do there. >> rose: why are you here. >> yeah,. >> rose: but look at what happened in lebanon. >> you know, we did the agreement. we ended the fighting. and you know, the interesting thing is that now 23 years later, almost every day you have a lebanese who says life is very bad. and another one who says we cannot do without him, until now so it wasn't that bad an agreement rdz what dot iranians want? >> you know what they say is that they want a peaceful settlement. this is what they say. they want negotiation between the government and the op zultion. i suppose you know they have a glad relationship with syria-- a good relationship with syria. and through syria they have influence in lebanon. >> rose: syria was a passage for them to send weapons to lebanon. >> i suppose it still is. >> rose: yeah, exactly. >> so they would like to keep some kind of-- . >> rose: to support hezbollah. >> to support hezbollah. >> rose: but when you sit down with the military and you say to them, i just came from the president's office and i spoke
fled into lebanon. and thousands more are on the waiting list. the war has put huge strains on neighboring countries, leading many struggling. -- leaving many families struggling. and >> the northern border of lebanon with syria, this is where thousands of refugees have escaped in august to years to escape serious moral and war -- syria's pergo civil war. -- berchtold civil war. this family had fled here because it's other boy, 3-year- old mohammed, had been abducted by pro-government militia and was presumed dead. now he has had to move on. the baby is older and stronger, but the family was forced to leave the school because of tensions because -- between local lebanese and the refugees. >> we left because of all the trouble there. sometimes i did not feel safe to be in a room. we may have been better off in syria. >> now in a different village, he is still not settled. he often goes back across the border to help the rebels inside syria. on one trip he shot this dramatic footage of an ssa attack on a government building in homs. some more refugees arrived in lebanon every
lebanon in the early 1980's. a very toxic makes that led them to take dramatic steps that climaxed in the assassination amount of pressure are was the target? >> because he was an american. not only american, but very visible president of the great university in the middle east. there was no more higher profile example of an american involved in that region than the presidency of a you be. >> the american university, beirut, back in the 1850's, what was a paper like? >> was and still is a multi cultural cosmopolitan city. then and now muslims, jews, and christians all next and co existed to a significant degree. in the american missionary presence was particularly significant in better, and it became sort of a launching pad for creating what became the greatest university in the region because of this american missionary connection. >> kid that university had been put in and other middle east and cities? >> perhaps. but the american presence was never anywhere else. the in visionary and practical of compassion. very patriotic the american. other nationalities to my other interests.
by the israeli persian and south lebanon in the early 1980's. was a very toxic mix that led them to take the steps in the assassination. >> why was he targeted? >> because he was an american and very visible presence in the greatest university in the middle east. there was no more high-profile example in that region than the presidency. >> was the american university put in beirut on purpose that in the 1850's was the root like? >> the route was and still is a very multicultural cosmopolitan international city where east meets west then and now muslims do some christians all mixed into a significant degree and the american missionary presence in the middle east was particularly significant in beirut and became the sort of launching pad for creating what became the greatest university in the region because of this connection. >> could that university have been put in another city and thrive? >> perhaps the presence was no greater anywhere else unless in addition to being ambitious and visionary and practical was american pity if he wanted to create a school that wasn't controlled by a nat
's the start of the process of discussion. that will be a good step. >> do you think lebanon is next? >> well, if-- some people think what this is about is in preparation for a likely war with iran. israel testing the rockets that would be fired against it from gaza, next from lebanon. so we may see something with lebanon soon. they say preliminary, this is a kind of warm-up round of the real conflagration ahead that involves iran. >> schieffer: you really think there's a chance israel would strike iran and try to take out those nuclear-- >> yes, especially given the timing of the gaza thing. they wait until after the american elections were over and now they're getting down to business. >> schieffer: all right. thank you all very much. let's hope everything comes out well. i'm not sure we got any information that indicated it will here today, but we can always hope. we'll be right back. for over 60,000 california foster children, the holidays can be an especially difficult time. everything's different now. sometimes i feel all alone. christmas used to be my favorite. i just don't expect anyt
in this eight-day conflict but they didn't get anything out of lebanon like they did four years ago. that is what they've got to be very fearful of, upwards of 50,000 missiles in lebanon that could rain down on israel at the same time coming from gaza. they could expect an attack on iran they would get missiles from both leojsz in addition to iran. they gained a lot of experience in this exercise far more so than when i was over there four years when they had an operation. they had nothing to stop the missles coming in. >>> now from what i understand hezbollah and lebanon have armed themselves with far more advanced weapons but the israelis have to be concerned about their bases and airfields. >> absolutely. because the airfields will be attacked simultaneously with attacks on civilian population. they are going to be trying to generate sorties toward iran, not towards lebanon and gaza. >> gregg: what about preparations for moving ground forces into both gaza, maybe to some extent on the west bank, but into lebanon? >> i think they are going to have to do both when they attack iran'
, there is a parallel. back in 2006 the war that israel fought against hezbollah in lebanon, then, in the wake of that war, hezbollah became politically much stronger in lebanon and, in fact, became the strongest party in the leave government. but, other middle east speaker would say look at longer term picture, you look at that border between israel and lebanon, the northern border, that has remained quiet, hezbollah did not try to take advantage of this latest trouble on the southern border with gaza, so, what they would say is look to the longer term, in the long term hamas will be at least more moderate and more peaceful. >>gregg: hezbollah is now rearmed with more powerful and sophisticated weapons so that may happen again. jonathan hunt, thank you very much. former israel special forces operator is a counterterrorism cutant and managing director at at security company and author of "brotherhood of warriors" and joins us now. we will talk first of all about the incident today, do you think hamas was trying to provoke israel and, in fact, succeeded? >>guest: well, i think -- i do. i think
's on lebanon or gaza, the israeli intent is to coerce the opposition to collapse into compliance but the result is the opposition gets stronger. >> james, you were mentioning eight years ago we ask this, and the intent was to crush a hamas. you saw the ground invasion, an extended occupation, and they leave hamas as strong as ever. >> when this happened is four years ago you could say we were close in 2007-08 to peace negotiations. nobody thinks that now. there is no sense now that there is any momentum at all towards an underlying solution to this problem. >> eliot: we're going to get to that if we have time. the large macro-settlement has fallen off the map apparently over the past two years. james, you address the domestic is really politics. is there a domestic gaza politics? is this a way that hamas wants this and they need to show that they're the more powerful, more potent within the middle east and islamic world. >> they were about to go to the united nations and make a plea, a grandstand play to have palestinian recognized as a side. the u.s. opposes opposes it. it's likely to fail. bu
are pouring into turkey and lebanon as the unrest continues in their country. united nations says the number of people who need humanitarian aid could hit 4 million by next year. >> also following a developing story -- a group of men were robbed and shot at after chasing a suspect. this was at 18th and jefferson place in northwest. it ended with the victim stopping at a white house security kiosks and asking for help their. we have the latest on that story. >> early this morning, a robbery that ended in a shootout. the victims, who did not want to be identified, said that they were leaving wor attacked. >> we were about to get in the car and leave when four guys jumped out with guns. >> it happened at 18th and jefferson place in northwest d.c. looking for a license plate some of the victims followed the suspect. >> one of them shot. >> after being shot at the victims drove toward the white house. >> they drove the vehicle down here, which i believe it was the u.s. secret service who were approached here. >> now they are looking for the suspect vehicle which is described as a white or silver
president reagan that 230 united states marines were killed in a barracks in beirut, lebanon. a terrible tragedy. people didn't call for the impeachment of president reagan. they said let's find out what happened, hold those responsible accountable. that's the same thing we should do here, and as we hold these hearings in the foreign relations commitee which i attended last week in a classify setting-- and the intelligence committees more and more information comes forward. we'll be able to make america safer and keep those who represent our country in dangerous places safer if we take an honest and objective view of what happened in beg. >> schieffer: all right, senator, we didn't have a lot of time this morning but i do want to thank you for coming by and giving that side of the story. i'll be right back with some thoughts of my own on another subject. i put away money. i was 21, so i said, "hmm, i want to retire at 55." and before you know it, i'm 58 years old. time went by very fast. it goes by too, too fast. ♪ but i would do it again in a heartbeat. [ laughs ] ♪ ♪ part of a wh
further the instability in the surrounding nations. >> and josh, take us to the north. lebanon and syria playing critical roles as well? >> absolutely. let's touch on these. zoom in the video up to lebanon. lebanon has a long history of racked by violence. recently there was an intelligence chief killed in a bombing inside lebanon. also one more thing that you should understand when you think about lebanon and that is the role of hezbollah. i believe we have video of hezbollah here. always a power strug inside lebanon involving hezbollah and the united states and other countries consider a terrorist organization. it's fiercely opposed to israel, any conflict between israel and palestinians can further the instability inside lebanon. finally, maybe last thing what we're talking about here, absolutely not the least, zoom to the east in this map, we're going over to syria which has been one of the biggest stories in the world since march of last year. there's a war raging there. and the opposition has been giving new figures lately about this war. the opposition has been saying that now as
to be displayed in february. last month the ro--iran captured footage and surrounding lebanon air spaces. >> heavy rain and snow and beijing. this caused congestion on major issues with the public transit. 23,000 residents are without electricity as they deal with downed trees and ice. >> still ahead on kron 4 news weekend it governor jerry brown is pushing for a temporary sales tax initiative. to save the california schools will have the latest effort and before that, and the look outside. this is the golden gate bridge a beautiful start to the day. keep in mind, 8: 4:02 a.m. one hour behind. daylight savings time. a:42 [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents fabulous but...when i add chicken, barbecue sauce... and cheese...and roll it up woo-wee! i've made a barbecue chicken crescent chow down. pillsbury crescents. let the making begin. here's a better idea. pillsbury grands! flaky layers biscuits in just 15 minutes the light delicate layers add a layer of warmth to your next dinner. pillsbury grands biscuits let the making begin. >> welcome back we have been enjoying beautiful weather with the
to hammering out the cease-fire. adding his voice to the discussion, the leader of hezbollah in lebanon. he sent a stern warning today to israel threatening major retaliation if israel makes a move on lebanon. hezbollah is not involved in the renewed hostilities but they have fought with israel in the past. tensions their shared border really has never gone away. >>> at least 117 people are dead after a massive fire at a clothing factory in bangladesh. it happened outside the capital city of dhaka. you can see every window is lit with flames. some workers tried to escape out the windows. there were about 2,000 workers, mostly women, in that factory and they expect, unfortunately, the death toll to rise. >>> well, they took a week off for thanksgiving, but congress gets back to work starting tomorrow. time is short, but they have a lot on their agenda. the senate returns tomorrow, the house officially goes back into session on tuesday. the so-called fiscal cliff is the biggest item that is sitting on the congressional agenda. if president obama and congress don't reach some sort of deal, hug
since the uprising began last year. unhcr staff say people are pouring into turkey, lebanon, and other neighboring countries. they say 2.5 million displaced citizens need humanitarian aid, based on information from the syrian arab red crescent. an tifist says they're having difficulty getting access to food, water, and other necessities. they say the fighting is prevent aid worker from reaching the needy. government and opposition forces have shown little sign of letting up. planes pounded ras al-ain in the northeast on tuesday pushing many toward the turkish border. >>> eurozone officials are taking a small step towards unifying their banking system. yuko joins us now. what will happen if necessity suck side? >>fficlsill be ae t help directly troubled banks and not go through their government. they were just at a starting point because finance chiefs of the european union agreed to set up by the end of this year a legal framework that would allow supervision of the banking industry. the move will set the stage for a unified oversight of commercial banks. the aim is boost the stability
supporting gaza, in yemen, lebanon, turkey and egypt. also different today, hamas has more weapons, including tanks, some are from iran. others taken from egypt, libya, after the fall of moammar gadhafi. but hamas remained vastly out-gunned by israel this is a big gamble for hamas, and many are paying with their lives. most are off the streets, we can hear the air raid drones, the inflaming the entire region. >> all right, richard engel in gaza tonight. one more thing, look at how social media has come into play. for israelis who follow twitter the israeli army is posting real time warnings when missiles are in the air, heading their way. hamas is also using twitter, but in this case, showing the rocket, netanyahu, and the message, sorry, we have been humiliated >>> in this country, david petraeus snuck in and out of capitol hill today like a star witness at a hearing, which in fact, he was. the former four-star general, former cia director until a week ago tonight was hidden from view as he testified in secret about his old job and what he knows about what happened in benghazi, libya, on 911
, that's why as jonas says, we have a cushion we dn't have when israel went into lebanon in 2008. >> brenda: last word, gary b? >> well, if you combine what jonas says, the psychology, plus what susan implied, a potential cutting in supply, you really could see a dramatic rise in gas prices. >> brenda: thanks, that's got to be the last word. it's not just the mideast spilling over, why folks acrosshe u.s. may need to [ heart beating, monitor beeping ] woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. >> in the northeast, thousands of victims of sandy still cleaning up as others start the rebuilding process and now folks across america may be about to feel the super storm's wrath. how so, toby. >> a lot of ways, number one insuran
a cushion we didn't have when israel went into lebanon in 2008. >> brenda: last word, gary b? >> well, if you combine what jonas says, the psychology, plus what susan implied, a potential cutting in supply, you really could see a dramatic rise in gas prices. >> brenda: thanks, that's got to be the last word. is not just the mideast spilling over, why folks across the u.s. may need to ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going onow -- but hurry, the offer ends soon. thor gets great rewards for his small business! your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics. put it on my spark card. ow. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve great rewards. [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choo unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ] >> in the northeast, thousands
and in lebanon, frank. >> now, the u.s. government has a strong stand against hamas. so who will meet with the hamas leaders to broker the peace deal? >> reporter: that's egypt's president right now. mohamed morsi has been meeting with hamas. of course, the united states won't sit down with hamas leaders because they have not renounced terrorism. so that complicates the situation even further. but egypt has stepped up to try to broker this peace deal. there was word that there would be an announcement of some type of temporary truce a 24-hour cooling-off period this afternoon. we haven't heard anything yet. but the international community scrambling right now at this hour to try to find a way to stop these air strikes, frank. >> very difficult decision or situation over there. okay, danielle, thank you for that live report. >>> four men are under arrest in an alleged terror plot busted in southern california. the fbi says the men conspired to kill americans overseas and in the u.s. and planned to join al qaeda and the taliban. one suspect is a 34-year-old man who served in the us air
rebombs gaza, there goes your breakfast nook. south lebanon wants to get in on the action so, much for the sun porch you just finished. and it was going to be so nice and you know there hasn't been a good carpenter in this area since-- oh-- oh-- uh-- but seriously, man, fix this, what have you been doing? disease, famine, global warming what are you doing, why won't you help us! >> after 12 undefeated games notre dame is going to their first title game since 1988. (applause) okay, that was worth it i'll give you that. but after the bcs drop by the mid reiss, they could use a little pick me up. rudy! rudy! yawway, yahweh.. wfern welcome back. my guest tonight an author, his new book is called the pat ree ark, the times of joseph p kennedy. welcome to the program david nassaw. hello, sir. how are you? >> doing well,. >> sir this book, this something right here. the patriarch. i'm going to start right in with joseph kennedy. so the biggest perhaps i guess misconception that i have is joseph kennedy's a bootlegger. joseph kennedy is one of the dukes of hazard. he made his money slingin
you so much, lebanon. >> youngstown. >> bowling green. >> cleveland. >> hamilton. >> portsmouth. >> zainesville. >> hello cincinnati! (laughter) >> jon: hello normalton, middlesberg, averageville, each undecided independent votersburry. vagisil, compton, i don't-- sitting through the policy speeches, that's one thing. but it's the relating to you. the never ending incessant relating to you. >> our part of wisconsin is just like this part of ohio. >> this looks just like where i come from. toledo and janesville have a lot in kmon. >> janesville is not that different from zainesville. >> where i come from. >> it's so similar to right here in new philadelphia. >> one of my best friends is from ago ron. >> oh, really? -- . >> jon: one of my best friends is from akron. i would let my daughter go out with someone from akron. well, if that was true with you would know that they prefer to be called akro-americans. (laughter) but don't let me interrupt your forced fun. >> o-h. >> i-o. >> o-h. >> io. >> oh reason io reason god i love that that's so fun. >> jon: yeah, it's not that fun. yo
need the money. and smiles. thank you. >> syria's civil war has spilled into turkey and lebanon and israel is getting dragged into the conflict and maybe it is just for a moment. but you know how the middle east goes, the death toll is growing all the while. [ female announcer ] a classic meatloaf recipe from stouffer's starts with ground beef, unions, and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of all? that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. >>shepard: for a second straight day the crisis in syria triggered an attack from israel and this time the hit was direct. yesterday, israel's military reported they fired a "warning shot" into syria after a shell from the syrian civil war struck an israeli military post. that was the first time israel had fired at syria in four decades today sources report that more stray mortar shells came so israeli soldiers say though fired back and hit a syrian army vehicle. the israeli soldiers were stationed along the border with syria. sources say the
't just anybody, either, he was captured on the border with lebanon in 2006 and this guy is said to have orchestrated and this guy got him out and got 1,000 palestinians released. now he is dead. now here we go. if you are one of the millions of men who have used androgel 1%, there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. wen and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are, or may become pregnant or are
and gaza, hezbollah in the northern border in lebanon, because in 2006 when the israeli soldier was kidnapped in gaza? israel went into gaza and was preoccupied and hezbollah took that opportunity to start firing rockets across the northern border and we know what happened with the war between hezbollah and israel that followed. >>trace: and now the managing director of the washington institute and former senior director for middle eastbound affairs -- middle eastern affairs. you heard what he said about the president of egyptian. does he want to be attached to hamas? >>guest: morsi is torn between his role as the leader of the muslim brotherhood which has been linked with hamas and as a president of egypt. he is not helping palestinians in what he is doing because it is hamas that is bringing the suffering on the palestinians of gaza in contrast to the peace in the west bank under the palestinian authority. he is not acting in favor of egyptian interests because the same terrorist groups are targeting egyptian soldiers in the sinai, as well. >>trace: we saw back in 2006, israel
of the united states, iraq released the suspect now home in lebanon still considered a huge security threat to america. peter doocy following the story. >> reporter: vice president biden called iraqi prime minister maliki this week and told him it was important not to release the hezbollah affiliated terrorist accused of killing at least five american troops. by the iraqi prime minister said his country no longer had legal grounds to hold them they released him. now he's back home in beirut. republican senators mccain and graham are floored by the way things unfolded and released a joint statement that says, the release further shows that america's influence in the region is waning as a result of this administration's failed foreign policy. the united states now has so little influence that it could not prevail upon the iraqi government to extradite him to the united states to stand trial for his crimes. senator mccain did not stop there. >> this is an outrage families of those who were killed by this terrorist should also be outraged. >> reporter: the state department says they've been in
experience in lebanon in 2006 when they went in against hezbollah forces, they don't want to do it, but the prime minister thinks he may have no choice. my own gut tells me the next 48 hours, 72 hours will be critical, and there's a 50/50 chance of a diplomatic cease fire. >> wolf blitzer, thank you. make sure you join wolf blitzer tomorrow at 4:00 eastern for "the situation room," a special live edition from jerusalem. >>> okay, so just a moment ago on the air, and i want to make sure i have the right guy. okay, just a moment ago on the air, if you weren't watching, cnn's anderson cooper in gaza, reporting live from a balcony, and then this happened. >> one family, also two media centers -- whoa! that was a rather large explosion. that occurred, look out here. i can't actually see where the impact of that was. it's actually set off a number of car alarms. >> it looked like something over his left shoulder, not sure if it's a reflection or an explosion. but as anderson said, he nearly jumped out of his skin, and who wouldn't? we'll tell you what else is happening there. >> the cris
or italian. the cardinals hail from columbia, india, lebanon, nigeria, the philippines and one from the united states. a sign of where the church is growing in the global belt of asia and africa and with the elevation of the six cardinals, pope benedict xvi's papacy may go down in history as perhaps putting in place more members of the exclusive club than any before him and he has appointed well over half of the 120 men who will vote for his successor. >> benedict put a stamp not only on the college of cardinals but on the bishops that he has been appointing around the world, and, that is part of his legacy and it will be interesting to see how that plays out. >> reporter: the elevation of lebanon's cardinal is significant. showing how important the region is to the catholic church. the trip to syria was recently cancelled because of the unrest there. >> he's emphasizing the importance of the middle east and putting someone in there who really i think is a peace maker and willing to dialogue with all of the different parties, i think that is very important. >> reporter: pope benedic
are in the middle east to try to find their son. deborah and mark tys travelled to beirut, lebanon, but they're still no closer to knowing what happened to their son austin. last time austin spoke to his family was august 13th, when he was about to leave syria for lebanon. >> we had no idea who was holding austin and that is the primary reason that we have come to lebanon is to try to find out where austin is, and establish contact with him and bring him safely home. >> everyone we have spoken to and we have spoken to everyone we can has said the same thing, that they are unsure where he is, they don't know who he's with, where he is, we're hoping for answers and we're here appealing to the people in the region to have compassion on our family. to whom ever has our son right now, we ask you to treat him well, keep him safe, and return him to us as soon as possible. >> the tics say the syrian government told them it has no idea where their 31-year-old son is, but the couple was encouraged by an october youtube video showing him captive, but alive. >>> focusing on the battle in syria, the side
and turkey for about five days going. there has been, of course, the assassination last week in lebanon -- unclear yet who perpetrated that attack, but it is widely seen as being yet another pillover effect of -- spillover effect of the crisis. we have seen a terrorist plot foiled in jordan in which extremists potentially connected to al-qaeda were going to use arms that they had gotten from syria to undertake a terrorist attack inside jordan. so we have both the humanitarian dimensions inside syria, we have the refugee crisis and the necessary strain that that has put on countries that are hosting syrian refugees; lebanon, turkey, jordan. each of those countries hosts at least 100,000 registered refugees at an enormous cost and at a significant strain to their infrastructure. and we see the security dimension, the spillover effect that has taken place around the region. it is an incredibly dynamic and volatile conflict, one in which i think those observing it are continually surprised and overtaken by the pace of events on the ground. but that said, i think there are three constant fac
or statelets started, but i think to going over to borrow david's phrase of the lebanon as a nation of syria, i think that that's actually quite possible. that one sees various groups retreat to their ancestral strongholds. and you see a syria that really is for many, many years beholden to a conflict. the one last comment i would make is as i'm watching what happens in syria i am increasingly struck by the notion that we may be seeing the unraveling of the post-ottoman era in the labonte. and that that has huge implications, not only for syria but for the region more broadly. this is a part of the world that is really on its own, never been able to reckon fully with its minorities and how, as arabs, they would like to govern. and i think that's a huge question that will be coming in the months and years ahead. >> getting back to the question of the post assad, i went to given after that as well. but i think one lesson that some may have learned almost by accident about iraq is you do not find the people who know how to run the electrical stations, a water glass, the refiners, edges but everyth
in iran. you in the hopper some way -- >> actually, there were american hostage in lebanon. initially i was asked by the u.s. authorities not to visit the united states. while there were hostages in lebanon because they were negotiations to get them out and they didn't want to endanger them. and to be fair, the day that the last american hostage was freed and brought to safety, the american said to me there was no longer a problem, i could come whenever one appeared so they kept their word. this is the thing about meeting strange people. there's an official who does the job now, there's an official in, well, probably in washington who was the u.s. counterterrorism chief. there's an official who holds the rank of ambassador, but the job is so secret that while he's doing the job you can't say his name. you can't say what he lives and you can't describe any of his movements. and yet he runs the whole counterterrorism operation of the united states. and i met three of them. these invisible man. i me, i could write one hell of a spy novel. [laughter] but anyway, it was one of them put asked
areas. jordan, down here, israel and lebanon. this map here, what is your concern? >> welcome one of the things we worry about now are all 20 months of this, this would eventually become a regional conflict. a broader conflict in one confined to syria. we find that happening to some extent. we see strikes in turkey and violence crossing into lebanon. we see a massive outflow of refugees into turkey and lebanon and jordan. of course, iran is also involved in this conflict as well. this is one of the big concerns that the u.s. has had all along. bill: okay, i want to put a rock into this mix. i want to put talk about damascus. how does this factor in? >> welcome is syria has long been, as you said, but ron's only ally in this region. they used syria is a place to connect with proxies like hezbollah or islamic jihad. it will be a major strategic blow for ron and will really constrain the ability to project power. that would be a concern. that is one of the reasons you see these gulf states get involved in supporting this opposition. it is a proxy battle against iran. bill: to take th
in syria, it is in our national interest that the support of the shia in lebanon by syria interrupted and syria not become a base and protection of iranian policy and from that point of view assad's victory in the civil war would be against the american national interests. from that point of view it is desirable to -- if you look at the performance of the rebels up to now, we have to be careful not to repeat in syria what we did in afghanistan of ethnic groups if they achieve total victory, a significant sash of their own -- extremely complicated. i am opposed to using american ground forces or american military forces except for the objective of weakening the iranian position and engage in diplomatic activity, i would aim -- >> let me ask my final question and i will open and up. on a broader point you started to touch on which is fair to say we have seen a wide variety of american leadership roles or attempted leadership roles in the last decade. i am curious how you would define the proper leadership goal for the united states at this point at the beginning of the 20 first century?
invaded lebanon, southern lebanon not long ago and that turned out to be a big mess, because it was a poor-planned, even more poorly executed. this is much more difficult. people's vision of gaza is that it's this desert and so on. no. as ayman said it's 1.5 million people, all packed into an urban area. extremely difficult ter plain which to maneuver. very, very hard to fight in. and if israel goes in there it's liable to be quite a mess. so i think although it's always possible this could turn into a wider conflict on the ground, israel is probably going to think about restraining. >> okay. we have positioned the warship "iwo jima" somewhere nearby. what extent would the united states get involved? >> well, we have frequently been involved by providing command and control, awacs, helping them control air strikes and air space and so on. but anything further i think we're unlikely to be involved. the one way we might get involved, if there's -- if it widens so that iran, who has patrol boats in the gulf, decides that it's going to take this opportunity to start shooting the place up, then
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